Ep 39 Lying, naked, and under a doona with author Lyn Yeowart

I always wanted to be a novelist,’ Lyn Yeowart says, ‘but here I am, 62 years old, with just novel number one out … because self-doubt (a long-lasting legacy of my father’s rule by fear, humiliation and oppression) is something I’ve lived with a long time and stopped me writing or, to be more accurate, stopped me presenting my work to anyone.

But once I did, an exhilarating journey began, and hopefully won’t stop till I can’t read or write any more.’

Lyn is a professional writer and editor with more than 25 years of experience in writing and editing everything from captions for artworks to speeches for executives. Her debut novel, The Silent Listener, is a gripping psychological thriller set in three timeframes, and is loosely based on events from her childhood in rural Victoria.

In episode 39 of James and Ashley Stay at Home, Lyn discusses living with the legacy of child abuse and revealing it to the world, hardship and isolation in rural Australia, and her main character’s experience with synesthesia.

She also shares why she didn’t feel she could write a novel until later in life, drawing on the Sylvia Plath quote, ‘The worst enemy to creativity is self-doubt.’

This episode also debuts out new segment #WhatAreYouWearing? And hopefully, based on James’s response, we never feature it again.

Books and authors discussed in this episode:
The Spiral by Iain Ryan
Humankind, a Hopeful History by Rutger Bregman
Utopia for Realists by Rutger Bregman
How Fiction Works by James Woods
The Important Things by Audrey Molloy
The Looming Tower by Lawrence Wright
Destiny Disrupted: A History of the World Through Islamic Eyes by Tamim Ansary
One Hundred Years of Dirt by Rick Morton

Listen to episode 39 of James and Ashley Stay at Home here, or on Apple podcasts, SpotifyStitcher, or your favourite podcast app, and find out about past episodes here.

And if you’re keen to follow Lyn’s advice, conquer your self-doubt, and connect with your creativity, my online workshop, The Joy of Creative Writing, is happening on Tuesday 5 October. Details here >>

Unleash your creative genius

Humans are creative creatures. Look at everything we’ve created, from the Eiffel Tower to competitive hot dog eating to this amphibious bicycle.

Ready to bike across the Atlantic!

I’m always bursting with ideas (though none as great as that Floaty the Bubble Bike). And I’m sure you are too – even if you don’t know it.

This has been one of the delights of becoming an author. When I was writing my first book, one of my 8000 worries was that I only had this one idea. What if I wrote the book, and it got published, but then I couldn’t think of anything else to write about?

But learning to write meant, in part, learning to pay attention to my creativity. And the more I paid attention to it, the more I realised the problem wasn’t too few ideas.

It was too many.

Now I have a list of about a dozen ideas for books, some more far-fetched than others. I have ideas for essays scrawled all over the place, and no time to even start them.

More and more research is showing how creativity is a muscle, and that even if our adult selves have been conditioned to tune out our creative impulses, they’re still there. We just need to rebuild them, which basically means to start listening again.

Elizabeth Gilbert has lots of wonderful things to say about this in Big Magic. Do yourself a favour, listen to her narrate the audiobook. She advises having an affair with your creativity – sneak it into your life however you can manage, get excited, let it be joyful.

Elizabeth Gilbert on Big Magic - Vogue
Elizabeth Gilbert’s Big Magic

And creativity is worth pursuing, not just for the joy, but also because it can be healing! As art therapist Karin Foxwell explained in an interview, creativity can help people discover why they feel the way they do and how they express meaning in their lives.

It’s also worth keeping in mind that creativity is a practice – that means just sitting down and doing it. There’s incredible freedom in that. There’s no right or wrong way to be creative, whether you’re writing or dancing or gardening.

Recently I had the opportunity to discuss all of this with author, Story Room Aus host and positive ageing activist Karen Sander for her podcast, Ageing Fearlessly.

Ageing Fearlessly Podcast

In my work at Writing NSW, I’ve met a lot of people who started writing later in life, often in retirement. They usually say that they always wanted to write, but that they never had the time. I always admire them for finally making time to reconnect with their creative selves.

In my interview with Karen, I talk about the process of developing my writing practice and prioritising creativity, and share tips and resources for doing the same.

Wishing you creative joy,
Ashley
xo

Ep 38 How to survive an earthquake with Michelle Tom

‘I went on a post-mortem enquiry. How did we end up here? We were five and now we’re two.’

Michelle Tom began her writing career as a print journalist in her native New Zealand. Michelle was selected for the ACT Writers Centre HARDCOPY 2019 program and for a Varuna Memoir Masterclass in 2017. Michelle lives in Melbourne with her husband and two youngest children.

Her vulnerable and cathartic memoir, Ten Thousand Aftershocks, explores two key traumas – the multifaceted abuse she experienced during childhood, and her survival of the 2021 Christchurch earthquake.

Together, we discuss how she began writing the memoir, the process of re-examining trauma, and her choice to tell the story in fragmented vignettes.

The fragmented narrative style wasn’t her initial choice. When she attend a one-week masterclass with one of Australia’s best-known memoir authors, she realised a lot of her early draft wasn’t working.

‘I’d gone to Varuna thinking that week was going to clarify everything and I went to Patti Miller who was running the course and basically said, Tell me how to structure this and she said, Darling, you’re going to have to figure that out for yourself.’

This episode also features a record-breaking What Are You Reading segment, in which James recalls the time someone recommended he read Lee Child’s Jack Reacher series because the main character is 6’9, the same height as James, and we determine that main character height may be the worst motivation for reading a book we’ve encountered.

Plus, is it going to be just James from now on?! Join us for an emotionally turbulent episode of James and Ashley Stay at Home!

Books and authors discussed in this episode:
Memoir Writing For Dummies by Ryan Van Cleave
Trespasses: A Memoir by Lacy M Johnson
The Chronology of Water by Lidia Yuknavitch
– Lee Child’s Jack Reader series
To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf
The Return by Rachel Harrison
It by Stephen King
Girl, 11 by Amy Suiter Clarke
Far from the Tree by Andrew Solomon (of course!)

Plus Michelle’s fellow 2021 debut authors:
Girl, 11 by Amy Suiter Clarke
The Last of the Apple Blossom by Mary-Lou Stephens
Echoes by Shu-Ling Chua
What Does it Feel Like Being Born? by Jodie Miller
The Sentinel by Jacqueline Hodder
Eye of a Rook by Josephine Taylor (who we interviewed in episode 20)
– Smokehouse by Melissa Manning
– Sha’Kert by Ishmael Soledad
– Modern Marriage by Filip Vukašin
– The River Mouth by Karen Whittle-Herbert

Listen to episode 38 of James and Ashley Stay at Home here, or on Apple podcasts, SpotifyStitcher, or your favourite podcast app, and find out about past episodes here.

PS. Looking for more great bookish podcasts? Ep 382 of Words and Nerds introduces you to FIVE.

Listen, be interested and be brave: Q&A with Samia Goudie, Boundless Mentorship runner-up

The Boundless Indigenous Writer’s Mentorship, presented by Writing NSW and Text Publishing, is awarded to an unpublished Indigenous writer who has made substantial progress on a fiction or non-fiction writing project. The writer is paired with a senior Indigenous writer for a structured year-long mentorship.

The 2021 Boundless runner-up is Bundjalung writer Samia Goudie, for her memoir, The Woman Who Came from the Sea. She’ll be working under the mentorship of Goorie writer Melissa Lucashenko.

Samia Goudie, 2021 Boundless Mentorship runner-up

I’m especially excited for Samia because my husband and I had the honour of funding the 2021 runner-up mentorship. In this Q&A, she talks about her early experiences with writing, how she began to work on her memoir, writers that have inspired her, and her best writing tip.

When did you start writing, and what kind of writing did you first aspire to?
As a child and all through my teens writing was my to go safe place and I wrote prolifically. Stories, poetry, prose, mostly long streams of consciousness and long 10-page letters to my grandmother and pen pal friends.

The touch of a fresh sharpened pencil and feel of the pen on paper completely absorbed me. I was deeply traumatised as a young person, so reading, writing and painting were my world, my safe place, and helped me survive.

I had two significant English teachers. One was Mr Jardine, he wore a cravat. It was the 70s, he took us to A Clockwork Orange, exposed us to Russian writers, Blake, and the classics as well as contemporary Australian and American writers. In my mid-teens and I was introduced to feminists and Marx, which was unusual, through another English teacher, Elizabeth Cousins.

Elizabeth knew my life was hard and in many ways I couldn’t function in the mainstream-learning environment, so she just let me write whatever I liked and didn’t require I come to class. I’d meet with her regularly instead and she’d read my writing, point me to things to read and make comments and constantly encourage me.

I also did a radio show at my school, so I was very influenced by radio, drama, youth theatre and music. A real mix, symphony, opera, jazz. Mozart and Pink Floyd and Country. We didn’t have a TV till I was 11. So these things shaped my world.

I was an adopted baby, taken from my birth mum, and my parents were significantly older than all my friends’ parents. I had a very lonely and abusive childhood. I just didn’t fit in for all kinds of reasons, Race being just one, so, I had to have a rich inner life to survive.

I spent hours learning and reciting poetry, long form and verse. I loved acting, and I would write my own scripts and then spend hours playing all the characters.

As a young teenager I also spent a lot of time at the Aboriginal Tent Embassy and this is where I first started to understand that there were alternative stories and histories to the ones I was being exposed to. I’d grown up with Albert Namatjira on the living room wall, strict Methodists who had both been in the Army during WWII, and a father who grew up in an orphanage. I also spent long periods of time with relatives and then in institutions, so there were lots of disconnections and contradictions. Writing continues to fulfill the same role. It’s my safe place and my way to challenge the complexity of my inner and outer world. To give voice to these complexities and challenge the status quo of society. I love the craft, the voice, the landscape and terrain of stories. I love reading other people’s stories, ones that take you on a journey that transports you. That’s what I’d love to achieve. Telling a story that takes the reader on a journey.

I’ve written a lot of poetry over more recent years, up till then I put all my creativity into community projects, films, digital stories, events, concerts and lecturing and travelling.

Tell us about your memoir, The Woman Who Came from the Sea.
Last year after I had an accident and was having a lot of severe pain, I started writing again just for myself, to distract myself. It started to become what felt like a story, one that had been sitting inside me for decades. I decided okay, just write.

Once I made that decision words just flowed out faster than I could type. I have called this work The Woman Who Came from the Sea because the ocean, salt water, and fresh water have always been important in my life. I have experienced deep bliss surfing down the face of a clear blue wave and near death in the center of a cyclone in the middle of the ocean on a small yacht.

I’d say its memoir, but also could fall into being creative non-fiction. I don’t want to give away too much yet; I can say it’s a wild story, a story of adventure and survival against the odds. I know I have lived a life that’s very full and left of center. I actually hate boxes and strive to challenge being labeled or locked into other people’s definitions of who I am. I’d like that to be the same with my writing, I am not trying to write in a specific formula or write for a living. I am just writing.

Various people throughout my life have heard pieces of my life and always commented that they would love to read the full story. So, maybe they will get that chance. I hope so, that would be wonderful.

What books or authors have inspired your writing?
I have read broadly, the books that really stand out are always ones with rich landscapes and diverse voices. First Nations writing from this country has always had a special place ever since meeting and then reading the work of some of our early trailblazers, people like respected Elders Oodgeroo Noonuccal or Aunty Kerry Reed-Gilbert who founded the writing group I’m currently part of called Us Mob writers in Canberra.

Since being involved with Us Mob writers and First Nations Australia Writers Network, I have made a point to read nearly exclusively Aboriginal and Indigenous writers. We have so many talented storytellers; I have a never-ending pile.

I also love Hispanic and Latino and First Nations writers from the Americas where I lived for 12 years, mostly in the southwest. So, of course I am very impacted by the landscape of those places and the voices from those lands. I like to read and listen to stories that are recommended me by other writers. Films, theatre and podcasts inform me as well.

Jane Sullivan reviews 'Too Much Lip' by Melissa Lucashenko

Through the Boundless Mentorship, you’ll be working with author Melissa Lucashenko, winner of the 2019 Miles Franklin Literary Award. What are you hoping to take from this?
Being runner up in the Boundless Mentorship and being matched with Melissa Lucashenko, whose book Too Much Lip won the 2019 Miles Franklin Literary Award, is an extraordinary opportunity. The process of shaping my writing into structure and working out how to keep the story moving, is why it’s important for me to have a mentor. Just to get feedback and encouragement and not be so isolated means a lot.

I’m just grateful to learn whatever I can from her and hope it helps me bring my story to life.

What writing tip have you found most useful so far?
Right now, it’s just about getting the writing on the page. That’s the best tip I have had. Just write, don’t stop, don’t edit, just get it down first. The rest will follow. The others are to read and read a lot. I’d add listen. Listen, be interested and brave.

It’s scary sometimes, to be visible, but I have such a great community of writers who inspire me. Aunty Kerry kept telling me before she died that she’d watching me and will be on my back if I don’t write. So, I have to honor her, as she really believed in me.

I want to thank Boundless, Writing NSW, Text Publishers, Booktopia, the judges, and of course my generous sponsors. I hope I can give you something that rewards your choice in supporting me with this opportunity.

Time is precious, so, now, it’s back to my story. I hope you might get to read it one day.

Congrats also to this year’s Boundless winner, Torres Strait Islander Lenora Thaker. For more about the Boundless Indigenous Writer’s Mentorship, visit Writing NSW.

Ep 37 ‘The diagnosis was everything to me’

In episode 37 of James and Ashley Stay at Home, we speak to two neurodiverse authors about receiving diagnoses as adults, oversharing, figuring themselves out through their writing, and so much more.

Anna Whateley is an #OwnVoices author and proudly autistic, with ADHD and sensory processing disorder. Her debut novel, Peta Lyre’s Rating Normal, is about 16-year-old neurodivergent Peta Lyre, who is the success story of social training until she finds herself on a school ski trip – and falling in love with the new girl. Her next novel, Tearing Myself Together will be released early 2022 with Allen & Unwin. She lives in Brisbane.

Kay Kerr is a freelance writer and YA author from the Sunshine Coast, Australia. She was writing her debut novel Please Don’t Hug Me when she was diagnosed with autism, and she is passionate about autism and wider disability representation in YA fiction. Her second novel Social Queue is a romantic coming-of-age story featuring an autistic teenage girl, and it’s coming out in October 2021.

Their humourous and recommendation-filled newsletter, The Overshare, features seven sections:
Listen Up–for all things auditory and musical
All The Feels–for sensory gadgets and neurodivergent products we are loving
Off The Shelf–bookish things including what we are reading and upcoming events
Uh Oh–life disasters, bloopers and social mistakes
Leaving The House–pretty self explanatory
Who Put Me In Charge–challenges in parenting, executive functioning, and life admin
Scratch Pad–to share new writing bits and pieces.

Books and authors discussed in this episode:
Late Bloomer by Clem Bastow;
The Boy from the Mish by Gary Lonesborough;
Henry Hamlet’s Heart by Rhiannon Wilde;
Future Girl by Asphyxia;
When We Were Orphans by Kazuo Ishiguro;
The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro;
Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro;
Vodka and Apple Juice by Jay Martin;
A History of My Brief History by Billy Ray Belcourt;
The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson

Listen to episode 37 of James and Ashley Stay at Home here, or on Apple podcasts, SpotifyStitcher, or your favourite podcast app, and find out about past episodes here.

Ep 36 Secrets, solace and deafness with Fiona Murphy

Fiona Murphy was born deaf in one ear, and for 25 years, she kept her deafness a secret. The Shape of Sound shares her journey to understand the extraordinary and surprising ways in which her deafness has affected her life and identity.

In episode 36 of James and Ashley Stay at Home, we speak to Deaf poet and essayist Fiona Murphy. Her work has been published in Kill Your Darlings, Overland, Griffith Review and the Big Issue, among other publications. In 2019, she was awarded the Overland Fair Australia Essay Prize and the Monash Undergraduate Creative Writing Prize. In 2018, she was shortlisted for the Richell Prize and highly commended by the Wheeler Centre Next Chapter program.

In this episode, we learn about her experience developing a Deaf identity and coming to identify as disabled, and we also discuss how she came to write her beautiful memoir, in part through a brush with stand-up comedy.

Plus, Fiona shares her experience with vulnerability hangovers (they’re definitely a thing), tinnitus, and the corrosive power of secrets.

And of course we discuss author Andrew Solomon, because at this point we’re basically just a Far From the Tree tribute podcast.

Books and authors discussed in this episode
Far from the Tree by Andrew Solomon
The Past by Tessa Hadley
The Iceman by John Sandford
Storm Prey by John Sandford
Love, Clancy by Richard Glover
Flesh Wounds by Richard Glover

Join Ashley and a great line-up of authors for the Writers Unleashed Festival happening online, Saturday 21 August!

Listen to episode 36 of James and Ashley Stay at Home here, or on Apple podcasts, SpotifyStitcher, or your favourite podcast app, and find out about past episodes here.

Getting the most from writers’ groups

I’ve been in a writers’ group for over six years now, and the process of getting regular feedback has been transformative for my writing.

Whether you’re thinking about joining a writers’ group (do it!) or you’re in one already but think it could be more effective, here are my tips on getting the most out of the experience.

Find the right group for you
All writers’ groups are different, so it depends on what you’re looking for. The first one I tried focused on generating material in their sessions, then reading aloud and giving light verbal feedback. I think the most important thing you can get from a writers’ group is robust, in-depth feedback, but it depends what stage of the process you’re at. Don’t be afraid to try a few different groups before settling on one. Or form your own.

Exchange excerpts in advance
My group focusses on feedback, and our monthly meetings work like this: approximately one week before each meeting, we email our excerpt around, so we can all read them in advance. To me, this is essential. For one thing, it means I have time to re-read and think deeply about the excerpts. It also means I can make as many comments as I feel necessary, on what works as well as areas I think need improvement. This is a time commitment – everyone in my group sends up to 6000 words each month – but it’s worth it for the quality of feedback.

With one of my two writers’ groups

Set the rules
When my group gives feedback, we follow a set of rules: if my excerpt is being discussed, everyone takes turns giving me their main points of feedback – they may have written more comments for me, but verbally they only raise their key points. As the feedback recipient, I can’t talk until everyone is done – I can’t explain what a certain paragraph meant, or tell the reader why they misunderstood. I shut up and take notes until everyone is done, then I have five minutes to ask questions. This helps to keep the meeting moving along. This also gives the writer a chance to absorb the feedback and think about why the person might have interpreted the excerpt in a particular way.

Another rule we stick to is restricting the group to five members. Three is too few, and six means we don’t have enough time in our meetings to fully discuss each piece.

Finesse your feedback
Great feedback focuses on your experience as a reader, while drawing on your expertise as a writer. Note what works well, what captivates your attention, where you feel the tension building, and your emotional investment in the scene. Note also where you’re jolted out of the scene, where the description drags, where you’re confused or uncertain. This can be most helpful when it comes to the balance of showing and telling. Are the details showing what the writer thinks they are? Your own writing skills will improve as you develop your ability to pinpoint what works in others’ writing, no matter the genre.

Find your writers’ group
State and local writers’ centres are a good place to find a group. Writing NSW hosts over 30 groups and lists more around the state, some of which are open to new members. Early each year, they also host a Writers’ Group Open Night, which is a chance to learn about the various groups, meet their members, and discuss.

If you can’t access an in-person group, you might try joining an online writers’ group. One way to do this is to take an online writing course, and connect with others looking for ongoing peer support and feedback. In Writing NSW’s online writing courses, online groups often form after the course.*

Scenes from our Mudgee writers’ group retreat 2021

Looking for more writing advice? Check out these posts
The secret to fighting project inertia
Be the fan you wish you had
Trust the process
How to write a book in 5 words a day
From final draft to publication to audiobook
Rejection goals and more: an interview

sutherlandshire-baxter-kalagian-blunt authors

This August, you can also join me for two online sessions with Writers Unleashed.

Writers Unleashed Festival
Saturday 21 August 2021
Online!
Full-festival access pass $90
Writers Unleashed has a fantastic line-up of authors on this year’s online program, and I’ll be taking part in two sessions:

Getting Your Scenes Right: The Nitty-Gritty of Scene Structure
9:30-10:30am **live**

Social Media and Building an Author Profile
Pre-recorded, part of your seven-day access pass
Ashley Kalagian Blunt & ​Alan Baxter

Hope to see you there!
xo

*These tips were originally published on Word Mothers.

Ep 33 Writing yourself back to health with Joanna Nell, GP and bestselling author

Joanna Nell worked as a GP until a 10-pin bowling accident led to her becoming a bestselling author.

Now, she jokes that she works part-time as a GP and full-time as a writer. Her novels feature ‘young-at-heart characters who are not afraid to break the rules and defy society’s expectations of ageing’.

In episode 33 of James and Ashley Stay at Home, we talk to Joanna about her focus on on positive ageing. This ep also features what she describes as the most fantastic question she’s ever been asked.

Joanna is a Sydney-based writer, GP and advocate for positive ageing. Her bestselling debut novel The Single Ladies of Jacaranda Retirement Village was published in 2018 with rights sold internationally. Her second novel The Last Voyage of Mrs Henry Parker was published in 2019.

Her latest novel is The Great Escape From Woodlands Nursing Home, which James describes as full of warmth, humour and charm.

Want to win a copy of The Great Escape from Woodlands Nursing HomeSign up for my monthly author news here and enter the upcoming draw >>

Books and authors discussed in this episode
Providing Good Care at Night for Older People by Diana Kerr and Heather Wilkinson;
The Ripping Tree by Nikki Gemmell;
On Quiet by Nikki Gemmell;
– Beautiful Kate by Newton Thornburg;
Far from the Tree by Andrew Solomon

Listen to episode 33 of James and Ashley Stay at Home here, or on Apple podcasts, SpotifyStitcher, or your favourite podcast app, and find out about past episodes here.

You can find Joanna on her website and across social media, and get The Great Escape from Woodlands Nursing Home from all book retailers – bonus points for supporting local booksellers, who support local authors!

Ep 32 Writing the story you want to write with author RWR McDonald

When RWR (Rob) McDonald was writing his award-winning debut novel The Nancys, he was working full time in a high-stress job, studying a master’s degree, and was also a dad to two young girls.

Around the time he got a literary agent, he decided to take a step down, career-wise, into a lower-stress role. Which seemed like a great decision for his health and sanity.

But then he ended up with shingles, and a serious chest infection.

Rob is an award-winning author, a Kiwi and Queer dad living in Melbourne with his two daughters and one HarryCat. His debut novel, The Nancys, won Best First Novel in the 2020 Ngaio Marsh Awards, and was a finalist in the Best Novel category. It was shortlisted for Best First Novel in the 2020 Ned Kelly Awards, and Highly Commended for an Unpublished Manuscript in the 2017 Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards. Nancy Business is his second novel.

(And you might remember Rob from the fantastic job he did launching How to Be Australian!)

In episode 32 of James and Ashley Stay at Home, Rob discusses how pushing himself through parenting, study, high-stress work and creative ambitions was the likely trigger for ongoing health issues.

But, as he reveals, he’s now stepped back from high-stress work and is writing full time.

We also talk about using Nancy Drew as his inspiration for The Nancys, a series very much for adults, and writing his newest novel, Nancy Business.

We get into grief, post-traumatic stress disorder, and my favourite fictional character, Devon (no last name, it’s like Cher).

Want to win a signed copy of Nancy Business? Sign up for my monthly author news here and enter the upcoming draw >>

Books and authors discussed in this episode:
– Harold Robbins (contact Rob for title recommendations);
– The Nancy Drew series by Carolyn Keene;
Girl, 11 by Amy Suiter Clarke;
The Silent Listener by Lyn Yeowart;
Entangled Life by Merlin Sheldrake;
Goat Mountain by David Vann (who we interviewed in episode 23)

Listen to episode 32 of James and Ashley Stay at Home here, or on Apple podcasts, SpotifyStitcher, or your favourite podcast app, and find out about past episodes here.

You can find Rob on his website or across social media, and get Nancy Business from all book retailers – bonus points for supporting local booksellers, who support local authors!